a Spunky Korean

A Korean male always having a passion for active living, and enjoying getting his butt kicked in the gym and a WEST COAST lover, a graduate with a BA in Sociology. Also much into some other sectors like social media, IT and photography. I would like my blog to be a connection between my homeland, S. Korea and Canada that was my second home for years and also to be a connection to the people, places, and things for which I will always have a tremendous amount of affection.

mymodernmet:

The stunning Nasir al-mulk Mosque hides a gorgeous secret between the walls of its fairly traditional exterior: stepping inside is like walking into a kaleidoscope of colors. Every day, the rays of the early morning sun shine through colorful stained-glass windows, transforming the halls into a dazzling wonderland of rich hues, patterns, and light that play on the floor of the mosque.

what a beauty!!!

(via dexterpine)

Amy Winehouse

—Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow

karamazove:

Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow

Amy Winehouse

(via dexterpine)

Finally ended up coaxing my lady into believing there will be a much nicer gift for her the next time we have the day, so called the “White Day” in Korea again. With my meager income those chocolates out there were only an extravagant indulgence…  I know it is just a paltry excuse tho.. yeah blah blah… who really cares..!!!

instagram:

Capturing White Day Celebrations on Instagram

To see more photos and videos of White Day celebrations, browse the #whiteday, #ホワイトデー and #화이트데이 hashtags on Instagram.

On Friday, Japan, South Korea and other East Asian countries celebrate White Day, a day when men return Valentine favors to women. Unlike in Western cultures where couples exchange their mutual love on Valentine’s Day, in these countries the holiday is considered a day for women to show their love and appreciation for men by handing out chocolates and small gifts. In return, men are expected to return the favor a month later on March 14.

White Day has its origin in late 1970s Japan when a local confectionery company in Southern Japan started to market the idea with marshmallows, calling it Marshmallow Day. Now, the day is widely celebrated across East Asia, with gifts varying from candies and flowers, to more expensive fancy dinners and jewelry.

futurescope:

Look Inside.™: Mick Ebeling

This is the story of Not Impossible Labs founder Mick Ebeling. After reading about a boy named Daniel who lost both his arms during the civil war in South Sudan, Mick turned to technology to help. He traveled to Africa armed with 3D printers, Intel 2-in-1s and spools of plastic and, with Intel’s help, established the world’s first 3D prosthetic printing lab in Daniel’s village #lookinside

[Not Impossible Labs] [via doktorsblog]

koreastandardtime:

Now that the press has published the score sheets from the women’s figure-skating finals in Sochi, the evidence looks sadly compelling: although Adelina Sotnikova's short program and free skate were very strong, biased judging was very likely the decisive factor in denying Kim Yu-na the gold medal.
But there’s a silver lining for Kim: her stature remains undimmed in the skating world and in the eyes of the media. And unlike previous Olympians who’ve been victimized by terrible judging or officiating (e.g. Roy Jones Jr. in Seoul, Shin A-Lam in London), Kim already has a gold medal.
A few closing thoughts on the Sochi Olympics:
1. Outrage in South Korea over Sotnikova’s victory was such that Kim still would have been hailed a national hero if she had pouted, stamped her feet and complained that she was robbed of her rightful place on the podium. But she didn’t do any of that. Instead, the 23-year-old Kim responded to the judging controversy with grace and class, providing a lesson in sportsmanship and humility for a country where athletes, coaches and fans have too often failed to demonstrate either.
2. Russia probably has an incentive to support greater transparency in the Olympic figure skating judging process. Why? There’s a good chance that the 17-year-old Sotnikova and her 15-year-old compatriot Yulia Lipnitskaya will be part of the figure skating team that Russia sends to the next Winter Olympics in 2018. Remember who’s hosting those Games? Notwithstanding the high road taken by Kim, you could already script a pretty good skit for “SNL Korea”: “That’s a really nice figure skating performance you got there. Be a shame if something happened to the score.”
3. South Korea finished the Sochi Games with just three gold medals, half its haul in each of the previous two Winter Olympics. Of course, the country would have racked up a higher tally if it could have included the two individual gold medals won by…
4. …short-track skating star Ahn Hyun-soo. Ahn, a South Korean who competed for Russia as “Viktor Ahn,” enjoyed a remarkably successful Olympics in Sochi, also winning a team gold medal and a bronze medal. South Koreans were supportive of his success, focusing their anger instead on the Korea Skating Union for allegedly driving him away. Ten or 15 years ago, Ahn would have likely been branded a traitor. But last week, a Dong-a Ilbo editorial reacted to his victory in the men’s 1,000-meter final with pride:

His nationality change has emerged as a hot topic of debate in Korea and it was even reported to President Park Geun-hye. Truth needs to be told about this – whether Ahn was the victim of political fights within the skating community or he changed his citizenship for his dream – but we should not be obsessed with the nationality issue…After tireless efforts, he overcame his injury and skated faster than others with excellent skills. This represents the victory of his unwavering will in the face of challenges. We give a round of applause to the short-track “czar” for his comeback.

(Kim Yu-na photo by Korea.net on Flickr)

koreastandardtime:

Now that the press has published the score sheets from the women’s figure-skating finals in Sochi, the evidence looks sadly compelling: although Adelina Sotnikova's short program and free skate were very strong, biased judging was very likely the decisive factor in denying Kim Yu-na the gold medal.

But there’s a silver lining for Kim: her stature remains undimmed in the skating world and in the eyes of the media. And unlike previous Olympians who’ve been victimized by terrible judging or officiating (e.g. Roy Jones Jr. in Seoul, Shin A-Lam in London), Kim already has a gold medal.

A few closing thoughts on the Sochi Olympics:

1. Outrage in South Korea over Sotnikova’s victory was such that Kim still would have been hailed a national hero if she had pouted, stamped her feet and complained that she was robbed of her rightful place on the podium. But she didn’t do any of that. Instead, the 23-year-old Kim responded to the judging controversy with grace and class, providing a lesson in sportsmanship and humility for a country where athletes, coaches and fans have too often failed to demonstrate either.

2. Russia probably has an incentive to support greater transparency in the Olympic figure skating judging process. Why? There’s a good chance that the 17-year-old Sotnikova and her 15-year-old compatriot Yulia Lipnitskaya will be part of the figure skating team that Russia sends to the next Winter Olympics in 2018. Remember who’s hosting those Games? Notwithstanding the high road taken by Kim, you could already script a pretty good skit for “SNL Korea”: “That’s a really nice figure skating performance you got there. Be a shame if something happened to the score.”

3. South Korea finished the Sochi Games with just three gold medals, half its haul in each of the previous two Winter Olympics. Of course, the country would have racked up a higher tally if it could have included the two individual gold medals won by…

4. …short-track skating star Ahn Hyun-soo. Ahn, a South Korean who competed for Russia as “Viktor Ahn,” enjoyed a remarkably successful Olympics in Sochi, also winning a team gold medal and a bronze medal. South Koreans were supportive of his success, focusing their anger instead on the Korea Skating Union for allegedly driving him away. Ten or 15 years ago, Ahn would have likely been branded a traitor. But last week, a Dong-a Ilbo editorial reacted to his victory in the men’s 1,000-meter final with pride:

His nationality change has emerged as a hot topic of debate in Korea and it was even reported to President Park Geun-hye. Truth needs to be told about this – whether Ahn was the victim of political fights within the skating community or he changed his citizenship for his dream – but we should not be obsessed with the nationality issue…After tireless efforts, he overcame his injury and skated faster than others with excellent skills. This represents the victory of his unwavering will in the face of challenges. We give a round of applause to the short-track “czar” for his comeback.

(Kim Yu-na photo by Korea.net on Flickr)

a Spunky Korean turned 3 today!

a Spunky Korean turned 3 today!

(Source: assets)

두려움을 넘어서는 최선의 방법은 자신이 감추고 싶은 그 두려움을 사람들과 공유하는거야.

 척. 척. 척만 하다간 너를 더 다치게 할수 있어..

너의 두려움을 사람들과  공유하는것이야말로 너를 자유롭게 할수 있는거다.

koreastandardtime:

More than 500 students from the Busan University of Foreign Studies were enjoying a freshman orientation party at the Kolon Corp.-owned Mauna Ocean Resort in Gyeongju Monday night when the roof suddenly gave way, killing 10 and injuring more than 100.

Yonhap reports that local authorities believe heavy snow on the roof may have caused the collapse. That’s the sort of lame excuse you used to hear all the time during the 1990s when horrifying accidents occurred in South Korea with sickening regularity.

A Kolon spokesman tells Bloomberg that the company conducts its own safety checks of the resort because it isn’t subject to government inspections. Gee, you don’t say.

That is a joke!!

Sullar, The Chinese lunar new year in Korea in 2014

Watchig RMR via youtube on my smart tv! Pretty fancy, huh!?

baronessvonbaeddel:

“Ideology never says: I am ideological. It is necessary to be outside ideology, i.e. in scientific knowledge, to be able to say: I am in ideology (a quite exceptional case) or (the general case): I was in ideology. As is well known, the accusation of being in ideology only applies to others, never to oneself (unless one is really a Spinozist or a Marxist, which, in this matter, is to be exactly the same thing)." - Louis Althusser

baronessvonbaeddel:

Ideology never says: I am ideological. It is necessary to be outside ideology, i.e. in scientific knowledge, to be able to say: I am in ideology (a quite exceptional case) or (the general case): I was in ideology. As is well known, the accusation of being in ideology only applies to others, never to oneself (unless one is really a Spinozist or a Marxist, which, in this matter, is to be exactly the same thing).- Louis Althusser

(Source: animecommunist, via kikisdeliveryfanservice)

risarodil:

Complete set of my Frozen typographic series! 

For prints, tshirts, phone cases, bags, etc., you can check them on RedbubbleSociety6 :D

Lovely!!!!!