a Spunky Korean

Aug 11

[video]

Aug 03

[video]

Jun 20

[video]

Jun 10

My lil Jimmy Kim jr. Lol

My lil Jimmy Kim jr. Lol

Jun 09

[video]

Jun 06

Apple Will Launch Curved iWatch in October, Report Says -

Yeah here it comes!!!

May 07

whitehouse:

It’s time to #BringBackOurGirls.
Read about how the U.S. is helping Nigeria in the search for those who were kidnapped.

whitehouse:

It’s time to #BringBackOurGirls.

Read about how the U.S. is helping Nigeria in the search for those who were kidnapped.

Apr 24

[video]

Mar 27

[video]

Mar 18

[video]

Mar 15

Mar 14

Finally ended up coaxing my lady into believing there will be a much nicer gift for her the next time we have the day, so called the “White Day” in Korea again. With my meager income those chocolates out there were only an extravagant indulgence…  I know it is just a paltry excuse tho.. yeah blah blah… who really cares..!!!

[video]

[video]

Feb 24

koreastandardtime:

Now that the press has published the score sheets from the women’s figure-skating finals in Sochi, the evidence looks sadly compelling: although Adelina Sotnikova's short program and free skate were very strong, biased judging was very likely the decisive factor in denying Kim Yu-na the gold medal.
But there’s a silver lining for Kim: her stature remains undimmed in the skating world and in the eyes of the media. And unlike previous Olympians who’ve been victimized by terrible judging or officiating (e.g. Roy Jones Jr. in Seoul, Shin A-Lam in London), Kim already has a gold medal.
A few closing thoughts on the Sochi Olympics:
1. Outrage in South Korea over Sotnikova’s victory was such that Kim still would have been hailed a national hero if she had pouted, stamped her feet and complained that she was robbed of her rightful place on the podium. But she didn’t do any of that. Instead, the 23-year-old Kim responded to the judging controversy with grace and class, providing a lesson in sportsmanship and humility for a country where athletes, coaches and fans have too often failed to demonstrate either.
2. Russia probably has an incentive to support greater transparency in the Olympic figure skating judging process. Why? There’s a good chance that the 17-year-old Sotnikova and her 15-year-old compatriot Yulia Lipnitskaya will be part of the figure skating team that Russia sends to the next Winter Olympics in 2018. Remember who’s hosting those Games? Notwithstanding the high road taken by Kim, you could already script a pretty good skit for “SNL Korea”: “That’s a really nice figure skating performance you got there. Be a shame if something happened to the score.”
3. South Korea finished the Sochi Games with just three gold medals, half its haul in each of the previous two Winter Olympics. Of course, the country would have racked up a higher tally if it could have included the two individual gold medals won by…
4. …short-track skating star Ahn Hyun-soo. Ahn, a South Korean who competed for Russia as “Viktor Ahn,” enjoyed a remarkably successful Olympics in Sochi, also winning a team gold medal and a bronze medal. South Koreans were supportive of his success, focusing their anger instead on the Korea Skating Union for allegedly driving him away. Ten or 15 years ago, Ahn would have likely been branded a traitor. But last week, a Dong-a Ilbo editorial reacted to his victory in the men’s 1,000-meter final with pride:

His nationality change has emerged as a hot topic of debate in Korea and it was even reported to President Park Geun-hye. Truth needs to be told about this – whether Ahn was the victim of political fights within the skating community or he changed his citizenship for his dream – but we should not be obsessed with the nationality issue…After tireless efforts, he overcame his injury and skated faster than others with excellent skills. This represents the victory of his unwavering will in the face of challenges. We give a round of applause to the short-track “czar” for his comeback.

(Kim Yu-na photo by Korea.net on Flickr)

koreastandardtime:

Now that the press has published the score sheets from the women’s figure-skating finals in Sochi, the evidence looks sadly compelling: although Adelina Sotnikova's short program and free skate were very strong, biased judging was very likely the decisive factor in denying Kim Yu-na the gold medal.

But there’s a silver lining for Kim: her stature remains undimmed in the skating world and in the eyes of the media. And unlike previous Olympians who’ve been victimized by terrible judging or officiating (e.g. Roy Jones Jr. in Seoul, Shin A-Lam in London), Kim already has a gold medal.

A few closing thoughts on the Sochi Olympics:

1. Outrage in South Korea over Sotnikova’s victory was such that Kim still would have been hailed a national hero if she had pouted, stamped her feet and complained that she was robbed of her rightful place on the podium. But she didn’t do any of that. Instead, the 23-year-old Kim responded to the judging controversy with grace and class, providing a lesson in sportsmanship and humility for a country where athletes, coaches and fans have too often failed to demonstrate either.

2. Russia probably has an incentive to support greater transparency in the Olympic figure skating judging process. Why? There’s a good chance that the 17-year-old Sotnikova and her 15-year-old compatriot Yulia Lipnitskaya will be part of the figure skating team that Russia sends to the next Winter Olympics in 2018. Remember who’s hosting those Games? Notwithstanding the high road taken by Kim, you could already script a pretty good skit for “SNL Korea”: “That’s a really nice figure skating performance you got there. Be a shame if something happened to the score.”

3. South Korea finished the Sochi Games with just three gold medals, half its haul in each of the previous two Winter Olympics. Of course, the country would have racked up a higher tally if it could have included the two individual gold medals won by…

4. …short-track skating star Ahn Hyun-soo. Ahn, a South Korean who competed for Russia as “Viktor Ahn,” enjoyed a remarkably successful Olympics in Sochi, also winning a team gold medal and a bronze medal. South Koreans were supportive of his success, focusing their anger instead on the Korea Skating Union for allegedly driving him away. Ten or 15 years ago, Ahn would have likely been branded a traitor. But last week, a Dong-a Ilbo editorial reacted to his victory in the men’s 1,000-meter final with pride:

His nationality change has emerged as a hot topic of debate in Korea and it was even reported to President Park Geun-hye. Truth needs to be told about this – whether Ahn was the victim of political fights within the skating community or he changed his citizenship for his dream – but we should not be obsessed with the nationality issue…After tireless efforts, he overcame his injury and skated faster than others with excellent skills. This represents the victory of his unwavering will in the face of challenges. We give a round of applause to the short-track “czar” for his comeback.

(Kim Yu-na photo by Korea.net on Flickr)